Taiko no Tasujin Getting International Release On Switch & PlayStation 4

Taiko no Tasujin Getting International Release On Switch & PlayStation 4

Long running Japanese drumming simulator Taiko no Tasujin is headed to the rest of the world, Bandai Namco announced today via a suitably upbeat, manic, and colorful trailer. Titled Taiko no Tatsujin: Drum ‘n’ Fun! and Taiko no Tatsujin: Drum Session! For Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4 respectively, Taiko no Tasujin lands November 2nd with both versions offering exclusively features.

Originally a perennially popular multiplayer arcade game released in 2001, Taiko no Tasujin has been released exclusively in Japan other than a North American version in 2004 called Taiko: Drum Master. The news represents the first time the classic rhythm game reaches Europe and other parts of the world.

Taiko no Tasujin Getting International Release On Switch & PlayStation 4

The Switch version makes use of the Joy-Con controller to mimic the air drumming action of the arcade version, which featured a flesh and bones Taiko drum peripheral for an authentic experience. Said peripheral is currently available for the Japanese Switch version of the game. Unfortunately, the peripheral isn’t set to ship with international copies though third-party manufacturers are sure to cotton on if the release proves popular. Up to four players can join in the fun and play a variety of 20 different mini-games. In addition, the Switch port features characters from Splatoon 2 and Kirby.

Tatsujin: Drum Session! on PlayStation 4 focuses on multiplayer online competition with a ranking system, high scores, and a selection of unlockable cosmetic goodies to collect. Expect to encounter Pac-Man and Hello Kitty as you drum for rhythmical bragging rights.

Taiko no Tasujin Getting International Release On Switch & PlayStation 4

Japanese game developers have a rich history of creating compelling music-based games and we fully expect Tatsujin: Drum ‘n’ Fun! and Taiko no Tatsujin: Drum Session! to follow in very much the same footsteps. Both versions are set to include a wide variety of songs (though we don’t yet know if the library will match that of the arcade version though it will include classic Dragon Ball Z songs among other) and the usual addictive left-field Taiko nuttiness from the original. Both titles may be worth keeping an eye on for the enthusiasts among you given they offer different experiences.

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